トップページ | 2010年1月 »

2009年12月

Devious Intentions

日本語 

There is a little shrine box thing called butsudan in our living room, where our ancestors’ spirits are said to reside. We would sit down in front of it, burn some incense and pray. I was told not to ask favours of our ancestors; they would guide us in times of trouble, no doubt, yet it is not in their power to grant us our gratuitous wishes as they arise. (That particular duty lies in someone else’s realm, who is ever so generous.) So I keep to reports of my progress in this life when I sit down in front of butsudan.

I recently found that my little niece of two is quite a devout little thing. She told me to sit down in front of butsudan and pray, and when I willingly complied, enchanted by the request, she told me to shift, barely giving me enough time to say “Hello, grandfather and grandmother.” She sat down in perfect little seiza, her little back straight, with her little hands held together in a pious prayer. Lord knows what went through that pretty little head of hers, but what a pious little picture she made.

I wondered if my brother overdid that revere-the-ancestors business by taking her to Aomori to pay my other (living) grandmother respect. Maybe she got it into her head that this little shrine was another object that some homage was due, as I taught her this was where her great grand-parents were living. Strike while the iron is hot and impressionable and all that. Now she’s a perfect little Buddhist.

Or, it could also be because of her Christian leaning; the nursery school she goes to is a wonderful, caring place and also very Christian in that the school song has a bit about thanking our Father in Heaven and such, as I found out on her first Sports Day. (Apparently they have Prayer Time too.) Nowadays she sings this song now and again, particularly that bit about thanking our Lord, in that little child’s breathless manner, which is really sweet I have to say.

As these thoughts were coursing through my head, my little niece lowered her pious little hands and said, “Kaki chodai (gimme the persimmon), ” holding them out towards the butsudan with a big shiny orange persimmon placed in front of it as an offering to the resident spirits.

日本語 

| | コメント (0) | トラックバック (0)
|

下心

English

うちの居間には仏壇がある。ご先祖様にはお願いごとをしてはいけない、もちろんわたしたちのことを見守ってくださっていて、悩める時には導いてくださるだろうが、願いごとをいろいろとかなえてくれる力は先祖の霊にはないのだと教わった。そのため、仏壇に手を合わせるときには近況報告をするだけにしている。


最近、姪が二歳にしてすでに信心深いことを知った。仏壇の前に座ってお祈りしろとわたしに言うので、この命令に喜んだ叔母がいそいそと座り仏壇に声をかける間もなく、今度はどいてと言う。背筋をぴんと伸ばしてちんまりと完璧な正座をし、殊勝にも小さなお手手を合わせて座っている姿には、何を考えているのかは知らないが胸を打たれるものがあった。


もうひとりの健在にしている祖母に姪を会わせに
最近兄が青森まで連れていったのだが、どうも祖先崇拝の教えを少しやりすぎてしまったのではないか、とふと思った。この仏壇におじいちゃまおばあちゃまが住んでいるのよ、とわたしが姪に教えたので、仏壇にも表敬訪問をしなければならないと彼女は思ってしまったのだろうか。鉄は熱いうちに打てとやらで、今では立派に敬虔な仏教徒である。


いや、これはキリスト教の教えもあるのかもしれない。姪はとても素晴らしい保育園に通っているのだが、クリスチャン系の保育園で、園歌にも「天の神様に感謝します」というようなくだりがあることを運動会の日に知った。どうやら祈りの時間もあるらしい。最近では、姪はたまに園歌の特にその部分を家でも歌うようになった。間違った文節で息をのむ幼児の歌い方が何とも愛くるしいのだが。


そういったことをわたしがつらつらと考えているうちに、姪が小さな手をさげて、「カキちょうだい」と言って両手を仏壇のほうに差しだした。仏壇にはてらてらと光る大きなオレンジ色の柿がお供えしてあった。

English

| | コメント (0) | トラックバック (0)
|

Ponyo - Spoiler alert

After singing its theme song innumerable times while poking an aggravated niece's round belly, I finally watched "Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea". I'd like to come clean before I go any further; I am a fan of Studio Ghibli's, though there are some films that I have resisted and haven't watched to this day. I wasn't too keen on "Ponyo", despite the hype that the highly addictive theme song created, because it seemed as if Miyazaki was having too much fun with himself there for the film to be a general success.

At any rate, I watched it finally, and I was pleasantly surprised. I say surprised, because I had read somewhere that some oversea viewers thought the plot didn't quite make sense in some places, so I expected something in the lines of Princess Mononoke, but even more enmeshed in the Japanese mythology. The film turned out to be nothing of the sort; nothing is less perplexing than a little girl (albeit of unknown species) causing a world-engulfing tsunami, causing the Moon to go off its orbit, and creating general mayhem in the world, just to be with the boy of her heart's desire. Girls tend to do that.

The plot is obviously a re-write of "The Little Mermaid" (or at least its framework is), as the Little Mermaid's bubbly demise is even referred to in the film. I am surprised that I haven't come across any review that mentions this, and only hope that it is not a well-guarded conceit of the latest wonder of Studio Ghibli (...just found out that the Japanese Wikipedia page does mention this!)

I loved the film. What amazes me more than the not-so-cute frog-like form that Ponyo takes when she performs magic, is that a man as advanced in years as Miyazaki hasn't forgotten the heartache he must've felt when he first heard the tale of the Little Mermaid. As I remember, it was the most heart-breaking story for a child yet unacquainted with The Little Match Girl; the level of sadness quite unknown in Snow White or Red Riding Hood. I already love the man but what endears Miyazaki to me even more is that he evidently wanted to rescue the Little Mermaid from her beautiful but sad foamy end.

Haven't we all a sad story or two that we'd like to re-write, given the chance? My pet fantasy is that the phantom of a certain opera house turns out to be quite a good-looking ardent fellow, and receives love despite his rather irregular facial features. (Has someone done that already?) Miyazaki may be just having fun here, rewriting the choking tale and letting Little Mermaid have another go at the prince and her life, but he made a brilliant job of it. Our little fish-girl is full of life. No such nonsense as disappearing into sea foam and sacrificing herself for the sake of unrequited love with her; she grabs both her boy and life with her chicken-like hands. (Only worry I have is that the kind of love that makes a fish-girl forsake her world and magic is a little too weighty for a boy of five. They have a very long "Happy Ever After" to go through after this.)

So all in all, Ponyo may not have the serious, profound messages of other Ghibli films (though we could argue perhaps that Ponyo actually represents Nature and that what happens in the film is that Nature takes revenge on the human race and we finally learn to live in harmony with it when submerged by it, or something like that, if we must); it may not bring Miyazaki another Oscar home (a five-year old girl's love, no matter how cute, and geographically and cosmically catastrophic, cannot win against an octogenarian's love for the diseased wife). But it is an exuberant film, fairly bursting with the joy of loving and living, as only a five-year old can experience. A joy to watch.

| | コメント (0) | トラックバック (0)
|

Hunger

日本語 

The essay I wrote for July seminar. Undeniably patronising...though not intentional (does this make it even worse?)

Hunger is something that is unheard of in Japan nowadays, unless it is the self-inflicted kind. We only hear about people who were driven to eat dogs and bugs in times of extreme need, in stories passed down from grandparents' generation. (Insects may well be deemed delicacies in some rural areas, however. I have seen a man argue that bug cuisine is a veritable culture of Nagano and lament its gradual demise on TV once.)

It was an eye-opening experience for me, therefore, to visit Cambodia and meet its “hungry” people. “Hungry,” transcribed into katakana, means “aggressively acquisitive, driven, or determined to succeed.” The Cambodians I met during my short stay were hungry in both senses.

Cambodia has achieved an incredible recovery in a short period of time, although many parts of the country still lie in devastation the civil war left the country in. We flew into a magnificent modern airport, then I saw people still living in what appeared to be traditional hovels made of wood and straw, on the way into town from the airport. There may be a great chasm between those in power and the indigent in this country, but what I saw of the people subsequently on the trip was enough to make me believe that they would not stay there for long, what with their diligence and their indomitable aspirations.

Landmine victims play beautiful traditional music on the grounds of temples and shrines, with a sign that says that they do not want charity but we can leave something there if we appreciate their music. Young boys and girls dance at hotels at night, to tourists who enjoy traditional Cambodian food and “traditional” Cambodian dance. It was quite obvious that the boys were new to this dance, but I’m sure they’ll be quite professional in a year or so. At a breakfast table, one of the waiters came up to us and smiled broadly, and started talking to us. This friendly waiter stayed there after taking our orders, practising his English with us, while I became increasingly worried if we’d be served in time for the ferry. And our English guide told us that he was hoping to take classes in Japanese one day, so that he’d earn a lot more as a Japanese guide. Better English, or a “better language” directly translates to a lot more money in this country; a lot more money means a much better life, or at least no more hunger.

It was our good fortune to meet this guide, Mr. Pang, an intelligent young man, as casual chats with him gave us some insight into what life must have been like for him, growing up in Cambodia's troubled past. I had noticed that there was hardly any dog or cat meandering on the streets, so I became rather excited when I finally spotted a dog and I foolishly called out “Dog!” so there would be no mistake it was a dog. Mr. Pang instantly offered he knew a good restaurant if I liked dogs. In the following awkward moment, we both realised our mistakes. Another time, I mistook a statue for a live monkey, and that led him to tell us how they used to catch monkeys and eat them, but their hands. Their hands looked too human.

Cambodian people I came across on this short trip were both hungry and ハングリー. I thought I saw the reason behind the progress (if it indeed were progress) from the hovels to the airport at the end of the stay. I hope that one day, Mr. Pang will earn as big an income as any guide could, taking Japanese tourists around the country. And I’m sure he will not feel empty when his hunger is sated. That’ll be left to the next generation.

日本語 

| | コメント (0) | トラックバック (0)
|

ひもじい思い

English 

今日、日本でひもじい思いをしている人はそういないだろう。みずから課したというのでなければ。わたしたちにとって「飢餓」というのは、究極の状態で犬や虫を食べたという話を祖父母の代から聞かされるくらいだ。(昆虫は地方によっては郷土料理となっているところもあるかもしれないが。あるときテレビ番組で、昆虫料理は長野の立派な食文化であると熱心に説き、この文化が次第に失われていくことを嘆いている人がいた。)

そのため、カンボジアでひもじい思いをしている人々と出会ったのは、わたしとって非常に考えさせられる経験だった。日本語で「ハングリー」というと「ハングリー精神」のほうの意味もあるが、わたしがこの短い旅で出会ったカンボジアの人々はどちらの意味でもハングリーだった。

国に壊滅的な打撃を与えた内戦もそう古い記憶とはなっていないのに、カンボジアは奇跡的な復興を遂げた。まだ国の大半は荒野だとしても。空港は近代的で立派な建物だったが、市街地に向かう途中、伝統的な建て方なのか、わらと枝でつくった掘立小屋に住んでいる人々を見かけた。この国には権力者と困窮している人々の間に大きな格差があるのかもしれないが、しかしこの旅行で見たかぎり、勤勉で不屈の向上心をもつカンボジアの人々がその地位に長くとどまっているとは思えない。

地雷の被害者たちは、寺院の敷地で見事な伝統音楽を奏でる。近くには「憐れみは欲しくないので楽器を演奏します。私たちの音楽が気に入ったらお金を置いていってください」と書かれた紙が置いてあった。ホテルでは伝統舞踊と料理の夕べが開かれている。観光客の前で踊る青年たちは、あきらかにこの「伝統舞踊」を習いたてのようだったが、あと一年もすれば立派な踊り手になっていることだろう。あるとき朝食の席で、ウェイターがにかっとわたしたちに笑いかけ、しゃべり始めた。注文を取ってからもずっと英会話の練習をしているので、わたしはフェリーの時間に間に合うかどうか不安になったが。それから、ガイドさんはそのうち日本語のクラスに通いたいと教えてくれた。日本語のガイドのほうが英語のガイドよりもずっと稼ぎがいいそうだ。英語がうまくなることや日本語が話せることは、この国では大きな収入アップに直結している。大きな収入アップはワンランク上の生活を意味する。少なくとも、飢餓のない生活を。

このガイド、パンさんと出会えたのは幸運なことだった。彼と話す中で、貧窮にあえぐカンボジアで生まれ育った彼の人生がどのようなものだったのかを少しでも垣間見ることができた。街中で犬や猫を見かけることがなかったため、ようやく一匹見つけた時に、わたしは思わず「犬!」と無意味に叫んでしまった。するとパンさんはすかさず、「犬が好きならいいレストラン知ってますよ」と教えてくれた。気まずい一瞬の後、わたしたちはたがいに間違いを悟った。また、わたしが石像を本物の猿だと勘違いしたときには、猿をつかまえて食べたものだが手だけは食べなかったという話をしてくれた。人間の手に似すぎているからだという。

カンボジアの人々はハングリーで「ハングリー」だった。旅の終わりには、掘立小屋からあの空港へと彼らが行きついた理由がわかったような気がした。いつか、パンさんも日本人観光客を相手にガイドとしてトップレベルの収入が稼げるようになればいいと思う。ひもじい思いをしなくなっても、彼なら空虚な思いにとりつかれることはないだろう。それは次の世代の話だ。

English 

| | コメント (0) | トラックバック (0)
|

Maniacs

日本語 

The Japanese language is supposedly one of the more complex languages, with its three different sets of scripts, which makes it hard to learn for people who had not the good fortune or otherwise to be born into it. Contrary to the popular and somewhat nationalistic perception that it is impossibly hard to learn for foreign people, I have known many who are as fluent in Japanese as they are adroit in using chopsticks, another inconceivable accomplishment. (Incidentally, those types tend to have the audacity to actually savour the hitherto sacred national food, natto.)

Roughly speaking, there are two types among these miraculous linguists: anime fans and martial art enthusiasts, and hapless JETs who found too much time on their hands alone at home during cold winter. Three. Three types. Of the three types, martial art enthusiasts tend to be the most devoted Japanophiles, presumably because of their intense nature, which thrives on adverse circumstances and self-torture.

When I first started college in Dublin, I joined the Aikido Club, no doubt temporarily overcame by homesickness. Much to my surprise, our instructor, a huge Irish man, turned out to be more radically Japanese than most Japanese men. He maintained strict order in his dojo; when it was near the time for lessons, without anyone uttering a command, we would sit down in a neat line in silence, from left to right in the order of our grades, awaiting the instructor’s arrival. No idle chatter during classes, as we took fall after fall in a graceful dance of ki.

Which means, in reality, a gentle grabbing of your opponent’s wrist, who would then gently urge you to take a careful roll on the tatami mats. I always thought of Aikido as a martial art for the softies; none of our club members was a stoically aggressive, martial artist type. That is to say, they did not strike me as macho men/women, not necessarily in physique, though that too, but in mentality. I cannot imagine any of us shouting “I’ll bust your face” in a brawl.

In my final year, our club was led by a girl who was so gentle and slim that you would not expect her to inflict any more violence on others than …well, with her sharp wit. Much to my alarm, however, this delicate flower has turned into a dangerously devout Aikido practitioner lately. She even “fondly” remembers our training weekend, when our instructor made us practice taking rolls endlessly. She bemoans the lack of vigorous treatment by the male population of the dojo.

If I’m honest, however, I do sympathise with her sentiments to some extent. I had toyed with the idea of going back to Aikido myself since I came back to Japan, and the one time I went to a local dojo, the abominable lack of order and discipline entirely disgusted me. Order and discipline. This has to be my inner ultra-right speaking.

What is it about martial arts that turns the laziest of us ever so slightly aggressive to yearn for vigorous training? Is it because of our savage past that we never had? Or is it because martial arts work on our instinct to submerge ourselves in something larger than our individual beings? Can it be that it is akin to religion in that sense? Maybe it is not coincidence that martial art practitioners come across as “devout” about their art. Religious people have their faith; North Koreans have their songs to march along to. Hippies have their marijuana and each other. Japan may not have the backbone of religion or nationalism; but we have martial arts. For hardcore maniacs, and for dyed-in-the-wool softies.

*Disclaimer: I do adore martial arts; just that I cannot personally muster enough ardour to devote myself to them. Also, I firmly believe natto is for everybody, not just for Japanese people.

日本語 

| | コメント (0) | トラックバック (0)
|

マニア

English 

日本語は難しい言語だとされている。ひらがな、かたかな、漢字と三種の文字をもつため、外国人には習得が困難だというのが一般的な(いくぶん国粋主義的な)意見だ。が、わたしはこれまで日本語が流暢な外国人を数多く見てきた。彼らはお箸と同じくらい上手に日本語を操る。これもまた日本人にとっては驚きの偉業なのだが。(ちなみに、彼らはたいてい厚かましくも日本人にしか理解できないはずの納豆すら大好きだということが多い。)

こういう非凡な言語学者たちは、おおまかに言ってふたつのタイプに分かれる。アニメファンと武道愛好家だ。どちらかといえば武道家たちのほうがより熱狂的な愛日派である。おそらく、逆境や克己を信条とするためだろう。

ダブリンに留学した際、わたしはホームシックのためか合気道クラブに入会した。驚いたことに、大男のアイルランド人の先生はそこらの日本人よりもよっぽど過激に日本人だった。道場では厳粛な秩序が保たれていた。クラスの時間が近づくと、誰が言い出すともなく、みんな何も言わずに左から右へと段位の順に一列に並んで座る。稽古中は無駄口をきく者などなく、投げられては起き上がってまた投げられに行き、優雅な「気」の踊りを舞うのだった。

というのはつまり、「敵」の手首をやさしく握ると、受け身をとれるように相手がそっとうながしてくれる、ということだ。わたしは常々合気道は「やわ」な人のための武道だと思っていた。クラブの面々をとってみても、誰一人として克己に燃えるストイックで攻撃的な武道家タイプではない。マッチョではないのだ。体格面のことを言っているわけではなく、まあ体格もそうなのだが、精神的にマッチョではない。取っ組み合いの喧嘩をする姿は想像もつかないような人ばかりだった。

最後の年に、見るからにほっそりとしていて優しそうなわたしの友人が部長になった。とても誰かをこてんぱんにのすような人ではない。当意即妙な受け答えで相手をやりこめるというのでなければ。それが、驚いたことに彼女は最近すっかり熱狂的な合気道家になりつつある。延々と受け身の練習をさせられた合宿のことを懐かしんだり、今の道場では男性陣が激しい技をかけてこないと文句を言ったりするくらいだ。

正直言って、彼女の気持ちはわかるところもある。わたしも帰国してから合気道をまたやってみようかという気になり、近所の道場に行ったことがあるが、秩序も何もあったものではないこの道場に大変憤慨したことがある。このときばかりは盾の会の一員になったような気分だった。

どんなにやる気のない者ですら、気がつくと思わず厳しい特訓を求めるようになっているのは一体どういうことなのだろう。これは武道が野蛮な過去の記憶を呼び起こすからだろうか。それとも、個々の人間などよりも大きな存在に身を任せてしまいたいという本能が刺激されるからだろうか。そういった意味で、武道は宗教と似ているとも言えるのかもしれない。宗教を信じる人には信仰がある。北朝鮮の人民には行進歌がある。ヒッピーにはマリファナと愛がある。日本には宗教や国家という屋台骨はないかもしれないが、それでも武道がある。熱狂的な武道マニアから正真正銘のやわ男まで楽しめる武道が。

English 

| | コメント (0) | トラックバック (0)
|

Girl Talk

Another essay I wrote for the seminar I go to. Supposed to be funny but ended up being just tedious.

“Girl Talk”

The term, “girl talk,” has a certain mystique and glamour about it. It is the quintessential girliness, the exclusive world of (presumably) young and attractive women.1 The term evokes sugar and spice and all things nice. That’s what girls are made of. When we say we are having girl talk, it means that we perceive ourselves as this epitome of all things nice. That we are girls.

It is safe to say, then, that “just having girl talk” does not imply that we have been talking about the recent change in petrol’s price or the most effective way to remove wine stain. The most common topic of girl talk, though it is highly arguable, may be said to be about men.

I do strongly question that “girl talk” should be effectually “men talk”; yet the alternatives are rather grim. Career, or the absence thereof, is a topic that we are also preoccupied with. This, however, tends to end in simple affirmation of our faith in each other, in response to either’s whining. Whining, of course, is a worthy and mutually enjoyable pastime, yet it requires caution in case its overdose should lead to exasperation and sheer misery. Success in one’s career is hardly talked about, either from humility or from lack of it. Furthermore, when it does occur, it does not offer much in the way of topic of conversation, as congratulations, no matter how sincerely uttered, unfortunately only take a few sentences. Career talk, then, is simply not as enjoyable as dissecting and discussing each other’s perceived crises and advances in romance.

This presents a problem when two women, who consider themselves as “girls,” gather for a good old chat, since it unearths the question that they may not, in actuality, qualify as girls any longer.2 For instance, the last time I saw my old friend, our “girl talk” degenerated into “which of us has more grey hair” competition. The middle-aged man at the next table must have been rather disturbed to see us showing the grey to each other, over a dinner table too, in a strange fit of passion to prove that one, indeed, had more grey than the other.3 While this was oddly engrossing, it cannot be denied that some other superior form of entertainment is desirable. It may well be that the ability to conduct girl talk is what distinguishes girls from non-girls, whose ingredients clearly include grey hair.


1 Currently or recently pregnant women are not included here. This is because talks about pregnancy, labour, and child-bearing should be more conveniently named “mummy talk” and discussed separately.
2 It should be noted here that there are various theories as to what constitutes the criterion of girls. Age is an obvious answer, yet I would argue that it is too simplistic for something as complicated and subjective as the girl question.
3 Incidentally, this has nearly happened with my brother too, who was very eager to see my grey; no doubt to prove that he has more. Grey hair seems to stir up competitive nature in us.

| | コメント (0) | トラックバック (0)
|

Male Prerogative

日本語 

This is one of the essays I wrote for the translation seminar I go to. We're given a theme each month, taken from a random sentence in the book we use. Thought I would put more efforts in it if I thought I'd put it up somewhere.

"Male prerogative"

The Japanese society has undergone some changes. Gone are the days when you could rely on men to do men stuff and wear men clothes. On top of that, we cannot trust women to do women stuff and wear women clothes either nowadays. Instead, we have girls playing in professional baseball leagues, and groomed, well-pruned effeminate hairless men prancing about in their skinny trousers with Gucci clutch bags.

It still came as a bit of surprise when I came across a programme on children’s television about “nail art” one night; in it, a young man of the above mentioned sort was teaching a girl and a goose the art of, well, “nail art”. It was actually quite informative and useful. For example, it’s the universal law that after you spend 20 minutes doing your nails, they get scratches that just ruin the whole work. He taught us how to repair the damages those pesky scratches do to nails (cover the scratches up by glittery nail polish in lovely gradation). He kept saying, “Nail Art starts in mistakes.” If I can bear having long finger nails for more than a few days, I would definitely give it a try. “Now that’s lovely,” he’d say, looking fondly at his pupil’s work. Japan has come a long way indeed since the days of samurai and hara-kiri.

All of which is a welcome change. After all, God has been long dead (and so has Nietzsche, come to that) and even postmodernism is looking stale now. This is the twenty-first century, for the late goodness’s sake. We are supposed to be living in a modern, postmodern, possibly post-postmodern society. It’s high time we broke free from this misconception that gender is the inherent order of things. Silly, really, if you think about it, when women go to war and men’s job is to stay at home and look pretty for a certain African tribe.

This is, however, not to say that I’m violently opposed to gender roles. In fact, you could even say it can be quite productive for a society to have gender roles…in a society where men come rushing to you as you walk towards the bathroom with gloved hands and a big brush, shouting, “Wait, I’ll do that! Don’t take THAT away from us!”

日本語 

| | コメント (0) | トラックバック (0)
|

男の領域

English 

最近NHK教育テレビが変わってきている。夕方に偶然つけた三チャンネルで、UAが派手な格好で童謡をジャジーに歌っているのを見て度肝を抜かれた。UAで育つ今どきの子供は、将来一体どんな音楽を聴くことになるのだろう。と思っていたら、今度は夜中にまたもや偶然教育テレビで奇怪なものを見つけた。

昨年かそこら、姫ファッションというものが世間を騒がせていたらしいが、この番組ではいわゆる「おネエ」ではないもののかなり男性臭の抜けた男性ネイリストの「王子様」が、かぶりものをした芸人ふたり(柳原可奈子による「姫」と鴨のような格好をした有吉弘行)にネイルアートを教えていた。王子様のレッスンは役に立つものばかりで、長い爪に数日以上我慢ができないわたしもぜひ試してみたいと思わされた。「うん、きれいにぬれてるね」と言う王子様を見て、放送枠を考えれば大人向けの番組とはいうものの、教育テレビでこんな番組が流されるようになった日本は真にジェンダーフリーの社会に近づきつつある、と思った。

これは喜ぶべき進歩だ。グッチのバッグを手に、細身の体に最新ファッションを着こなし、きれいに眉をお手入れした無駄毛のない「草食動物」男性で国中があふれかえっても、結婚率・出産率がかぎりなくゼロに近づいたとしても、「男性らしさ」「女性らしさ」というものが人間の本質的なものではなく、社会の選択にすぎないということが認識されるのはすばらしいことだ。神もニーチェもとっくに死んでポストモダンも古い今、そろそろ社会もジェンダーの枷から自由になってもいい頃なのだ。

とはいえ、わたしは別にジェンダーというものを目の敵にしているわけではない。役割分担というのは社会にとってある程度必要であるとすら思う。トイレでも掃除しようかというときに、「待って、それはぼくがやるよ。これだけは男の領域だから譲れない」と夫があせって駆けてくるというのであれば。

English 

| | コメント (0) | トラックバック (0)
|

オープンカフェ

海外旅行の楽しみはいろいろあるが、ひとつにその土地の食べ物を食するというものがある。たしかに、観光客向けの店で食事や買い物を済ませる快適さは否めない。どこに行っても食べ慣れたものがいいというむきもあろう。とはいえ、わたしはその国の代表的な食べ物をできれば現地の人が食べるようなところで食べてみたい。

カンボジアに行った際に、またこの「できれば本物の体験を」虫が騒いだ。首都プノンペンは復興・開発が進んでかなり立派なアジアの一都市になりつつあるが、それでも街外れには戦後日本を彷彿とさせるような光景がまだ残っている(終戦後の日本を知っているわけではないが)。

プノンペンの一角に西洋人街とでもいうような通りがあり、ここには高級レストランが集まり、西洋人が集う。内装はバリ島などのリゾート地のイメージで、道路に籐のテーブルと椅子が並べられ、オープンカフェになっている。夜になると電飾が点き、なんともデカダンな雰囲気だ。放浪した挙句に東洋で阿片を覚える西洋人の世界である。その区画は短く、観光客区が終わるととたんに道路の舗装はなくなり、埃だらけのむき出しの道路が続く。説明はしがたいが、わたしは生理的な嫌悪感を覚えた。はだしの現地人が埃の中を歩くわきで、西洋人が桁違いの額を払ってコーラを飲み、シェパードパイを食べている。

当然そこは端から眼中になく、目指した先は現地人の集うバーだった。昼間は何もなかった道路端に、メタルのテーブルとプラスチックの椅子が並び、移動式の屋台(といってもただの台といった方がいいような代物で、台湾の夜市の料理屋台を想像していただきたい)の後ろで女性二人が調理をしていた。

観光客は影も形もない。半径三キロ以内に外国人はいないだろう。これ以上はないくらい本格的にカンボジアだ。緊張しながら席に着き、ビールを注文した。一日の仕事を終えた地元の人が集う場所なのだろう。なかなか盛況で、(当然ながら)みんなカンボジア語で会話に興じている。風と埃の吹き抜ける、建物もない道路端で、薄暗がりの中カンボジアの夜が更ける。

観光客の性か、単なる写真好きか、このシュールで感動的な光景を写真に収めたかった。ためらわれた。冒涜、侮辱。シュールと感じる時点ですでにこの国の人々を珍奇な動物扱いしているのではないだろうか。題は「ハッテントジョウコクジンの生態」か。おとなしくあの外国人地区に行くべきだったのだろうか。

翌朝、その高級レストラン地区に通りかかった。前夜の華々しさは嘘のようで、日の光にさらされた砂だらけのそのオープンカフェは、昼間の花魁はかくもあろうかというものだった。従業員が埃を払って、歩道に突き出したカフェの一角をまた元通りのリゾート地高級カフェに整えようとしていた。魅惑の東洋も学芸会の劇の大道具(もしくは『シベリア超特急』)と変わらないのかと思え、その安っぽさに金持ち観光客への軽蔑の念を覚えてしまうと同時に不思議と心が安らかになった。

こうして彼らはこの国で手に入る材料でせっせと「魅惑の東洋」を作っている。セイヨウジンは舗道のある一画で「コーラ」と「ビーフシチュー」を、人間はこっちの土埃りオープンカフェで本物の食べ物を。頼まれもしないのにわたしが偉そうに義憤を感じる必要はなかった。ここの人々は充分にたくましい。

ちなみにプノンペンで食べたスパゲッティはこれまでのワーストワン、英国の某チェーンレストランのスパゲッティよりもまずかった。カンボジア料理の定番フォーがおいしかったのは言うまでもない。

| | コメント (0) | トラックバック (0)
|

ほつれた巻き毛

幼少のみぎりから日本古来の伝統を継承してつややかな碧の黒髪だった。つまり、直径何ミリだかは知らないが、まっすぐにしか生えることができないくらいの剛毛だった(しかも毛の量が異常に多かった。初めて行った床屋さんまたは美容院で、「毛が多いですねー」と言われなかったことはない)。当然、ふわふわとした柔らかな茶色のくせ毛にあこがれた。ふんわりとほつれさせてみたかった。

風になびくこともなくつねに固定状態の直毛だったわたしと違い、幼稚園で一緒だった彼女は幼稚園児でありながらすでに、今のわたしが美容院で高いお金を払っても手に入れることのできないフェミニンな髪型(重力を感じさせない、妖精でもひそんでいそうな空気感たっぷりのふわふわルック)を完成させていた。ある日、「なんで自分のことかっちゃんっていうの、おかしいよ」と彼女に指摘され、ショックを受けたことがある。四、五歳ですでに自分のことをわたしと呼べる幼稚園児。大人だった。(ちなみに名前まで彼女は恵まれていて、そのままで芸名になりそうな素敵な名前でうらやましかった。)

高校時代に初めてパーマをかけてみたが、大失敗に終わった。母が通っている家の斜め向かいのパーマ屋さんに行ったのがおそらく間違いの元だろう。見事なおばさんパーマで、彼女のような自然にうねうねとした巻き毛とは程遠かった。後に今度はおしゃれとされている美容院でパーマにふたたび挑戦したが、やはりパーマはパーマだった。

しかし、長年反発していた茶髪がいまさら大胆でも何でもなくなった頃に、人に言われてようやく毛を赤茶色に染めてみると、髪質が変化した。毛先が自然にゆるやかなたて巻きにカールするのだ。二、三日髪を洗わないでいると。特に耳のあたりの髪(もしかしてもみあげが伸びたものだったのだろうか?)のカール具合が他よりも強く、気に入っていた。当時の彼氏に喜んで巻き毛ぶりを報告すると、「髪洗ってないんだね」と、女心はわかってもらえなかった。

| | コメント (0) | トラックバック (0)
|

トップページ | 2010年1月 »